7 Types Of Skin Growths (You May Be Worried About Right Now)

Do you have a skin growth you’re concerned about on your face or elsewhere on your body?

Do you find yourself fretting about these types of growths and not knowing whether or not you should be worried?

Would you like to learn about some of the most common types of skin growths out there?

If so, don’t worry! We’re here to help.

In this article, we’ll introduce you to seven of the most common skin growths you may have to face at some point in your life. We’ll tell you about what causes these problems, how they can be treated, and when, if ever, you need to see a doctor.

Remember that you should always speak to a health care professional if you have any new type of skin growth you’ve never seen before, especially if you’re having trouble identifying what it might be. But if you’re facing something you’ve dealt with already, be sure to check out our list of info below to help you narrow down your treatment options.

Let’s get started!

Keloid

Scientific name: Keloidal scar

Where is it seen?

  • Anywhere on the body.

When does it happen?

  • This problem occurs when you have an injury to your skin that heals with the wrong type of collagen. Basically, it is too much collagen growing in one place on your skin. It can be large or small.

Causes

  • Any skin injury, from a deep wound to an ear piercing.
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    Genetics.

Treatment

  • Radiation may be used in some extreme cases.
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    Laser therapy is a good option when working with a dermatologist.
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    Surgery may be required if your keloid is very large or painful.
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    Small keloids can be treated with over-the-counter steroid creams or ointments.

When should you see a doctor?

  • If you have a keloid that becomes itchy or painful, see a doctor.

Cysts

Scientific name: Sebaceous cysts

Where is it seen?

  • Anywhere on the body, but usually in areas with a lot of friction, such as between the thighs or under the arms.

When does it happen?

  • This can happen at any point in your life, but it tends to affect people in their 20s and 30s quite often.

Causes

  • These cysts may occur when the sebaceous glands in your skin are blocked or otherwise damaged in some way.
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    They may also occur due to genetics.

Treatment

  • Some cysts may be treated with a warm compress.
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    Cysts may need to be lanced and drained.
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    Some may have to be surgically removed.

When should you see a doctor?

  • See a doctor if this is your first sebaceous cyst.

Acne

Scientific name: Acne

Where is it seen?

  • Anywhere on the face as well as the neck, chest, back, and sometimes legs and buttocks.

When does it happen?

  • Any time after puberty. Acne regularly affects adults of all ages.

Causes

  • Stress is a known factor in adult acne breakouts.
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    Genetics may contribute to this problem as well.
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    Hormones and hormone changes are a major cause of adult acne.
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    Although diet may not have the effect on acne that was once believed, it still can change your skin’s composition.

Treatment

  • You may treat acne with ointments containing salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide.
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    Some people use retinol to treat acne.

When should you see a doctor?

  • If your acne is very painful, see a doctor.

Liver Spots

Scientific name: Liver spots or age spots

Where is it seen?

  • Anywhere on the body, but usually on the face and hands.

When does it happen?

  • This problem occurs in people who are older than 50, but it may be seen in younger people as well.

Causes

  • Exposure to the sun causes liver spots.
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    Tanning beds and similar exposure to UV rays may also contribute to liver spots.

Treatment

  • You may use a bleaching cream to help get rid of liver spots.
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    Intense pulsed light therapy (IPL) and laser treatments may be very beneficial for treating liver spots.

When should you see a doctor?

  • See a doctor if your spots are itching, painful, burning, or change size, shape, or color.

Freckles

Scientific name: Freckles

Where is it seen?

  • Anywhere on the body, but primarily on the face.

When does it happen?

  • Freckles can form at any point in anyone’s life. Some people are born with a lot of freckles, while others develop them as an adult.

Causes

  • Genetics are one cause of freckles. People with fair complexions and red hair are more likely to have freckles from an early age.
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    Freckles can occur in people who are predisposed to having them with too much exposure to the sun or to UV rays used in tanning beds.

Treatment

  • Retinol is sometimes used to treat freckles.
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    Laser treatments may be able to remove freckles.

When should you see a doctor?

  • You should not need to see a doctor for freckles unless they are aesthetically bothering you.

Warts

Scientific name: Warts

Where is it seen?

  • Anywhere on the body.

When does it happen?

  • Warts can occur at any point in your life.

Causes

  • Warts are caused by the human papillomavirus, or HPV. They may or may not be related to HPV caused by intercourse.
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    Warts are more common in people with a skin injury.
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    Warts are contagious and can be spread from person to person.

Treatment

  • Laser treatments can remove warts successfully.
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    Cryotherapy (freezing) is a good way to remove smaller warts.
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    Chemical peels may remove warts.

When should you see a doctor?

  • See a doctor if you have an unexplained wart or if you have warts in the genital area.

Moles

Scientific name: Moles (different names for different types, such as nevus or melanoma)

Where is it seen?

  • Moles can occur anywhere on the body.

When does it happen?

  • Moles may form at any point in your life.

Causes

  • When your skin cells grow together instead of spreading out as they are supposed to, moles form.
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    Some moles, called congenital nevi, are present on babies when they are born and are sometimes called birthmarks.
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    Skin cancer can cause some types of moles, but not all.

Treatment

  • Moles are usually treated by surgical removal.
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    If your mole is actually a skin tag, it may be removed through electrosurgery or cryosurgery.

When should you see a doctor?

  • See a doctor if your mole changes shape, color, or size, if you get a new mole after age 25, or if a mole begins to itch, bleed, hurt, or ooze.

Conclusion

Were you able to figure out what might be going on with your skin condition? There are a lot of possibilities, and you may still be at a loss for what your skin is doing. If that’s the case, don’t forget to set up an appointment with a dermatologist or with your regular healthcare provider to make sure you don’t need to have something removed or further checked out. Otherwise, try some of the treatment options listed above, and you’ll be well on your way to healthier, happier skin in no time!

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